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Indoor NH3: It’s all about that base

Since ammonia concentrations are much higher indoors than outdoors, there must be indoor sources which emit ammonia. We know that ammonia is emitted from cleaning products, building materials, tobacco smoke, cooking activities, and humans (through exhaled breath and sweat).

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CIE and MoBE participation at the ISES-ISIAQ joint conference in Kaunas, 2019

This blog post was written by Erica Marie Hartmann, Assistant Professor at Northwestern University (profile, Twitter). By Pudelek (Marcin Szala) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link The International Societies for Exposure Science (ISES) and Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) are having a joint meeting August 18-22, 2019 in Kaunas, Lithuania. Grantees from both […]

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The ARTISTIC Field Campaign: an interview with Demetrios Pagonis

One of the biggest conclusions from the ARTISTIC campaign is how much people and our indoor activities impact indoor air quality, from the emissions on our breath, the emissions that come from our activities and the chemical products that we use; these things all change the chemistry of indoor spaces.

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3D printers and air pollution

Breathing in these large amounts of very small particles may lead to effects in our respiratory system. These particles are so small that they can cross over to the blood stream and reach other organs.

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A Clothing Conundrum

Morrison remained at Berkeley for his PhD with Bill Nazaroff. Here, he took a more quantitative look into carpet and ozone chemistry, measuring yields of pollutants formed by carpets and making predictions to feed into a model. Morrison still likes to incorporate modelling in all of his projects. “If there isn’t a modelling component, I don’t feel like I know what is going on,” he explains.

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Cleaning floors with bleach significantly alters indoor air chemistry

“When we wash with bleach, the oxidation occurs not only on the surface we are washing but everywhere else too”. Carslaw agrees, adding that bleach washing produces a much “wider group of chemicals than previously thought”, and that “chemists need to work much more closely with toxicologists” in order to determine the health impacts of the resulting, chemically-altered air.

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How dampness in homes impacts indoor air pollution

US researchers are exploring to what degree dampness in homes alters the chemistry and composition of the indoor air. The chemicals formed on wet indoor surfaces could be partially responsible for the increased respiratory symptoms seen in damp homes, an effect that has never been fully explained by mold and mildew.

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A Model Life

Carslaw furthers our knowledge by working with postdoc, Magdalena Kruza and PhD student, Zixu Wang, to use and develop her detailed chemical model with 31,000 lines of code, to simulate the chemistry of indoor air in exquisite detail.

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Why is indoor air chemistry important?

If you’re like the typical human, you likely spend about 90% of your time inside. Our homes, businesses, exercise facilities, cars, and gathering places are all examples of indoor environments where we’re constantly breathing the air. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the chemistry occurring in these spaces and what it means to our health and well-being.

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